The Virtue of Sharing Food

Picture it:  Evening out with friends at a newly discovered eatery with plenty of character.  Days counting down to the big event, you do your research and see what reviewers are saying and recommending. You’ve looked over the online menu and have carefully decided what you want to order.

Finally. Saturday night.  You and your party have arrived. Seated and menu in hand. Then, your server proceeds to list the the evenings specials.  Instant dilemma.  The chef’s special–leg of lamb with Moroccan spice rub sounds wonderfully delicious.  Do you stand firm and order the Chilean sea bass or switch?

Your dining companions all order different dishes. You stick to your guns and order the sea bass.  Moments later, everyone’s dishes arrive and start eating in unison.  This is your chance to ask for a taste of the leg of lamb from your mate, who is siting adjacent to you, ordered. He pleasantly agrees and in turn, you willingly return the favor.

The idea of sharing was instilled in us ever since youth.  Sharing is a virtue, considered to be generous and thoughtful.  Share your toys. Share the space on the park bench. Share your food. Heck, Asians have practiced this for ages: family style dining.

Not only is sharing a great way to sample different dishes, but it helps with eating healthier portions and reduces food waste.  When you eat out, how often will you finish the entire plate of food? Yes, you may wipe your plate clean dining in higher end restaurants–but what about everyday chain restaurants? Portions are gigantic!  Yes, there is the option to take food home, but admit it, there are many times when leftovers are left in the fridge for days, uneaten and eventually discarded.

So, if you decide to eat out tonight, split a meal with someone.

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2 thoughts on “The Virtue of Sharing Food

  1. I always thought that having your own meal was egocentric.

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